Sunday, June 26, 2016

Finding aid for the National Cryptologic Museum Library

A list of the books, reports and other files available at the National Cryptologic Museum Library has been uploaded at the NSA website.

I’ve added the file to my Google Drive and Scribd folders.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Missing paragraphs from TICOM report I-22 ‘Interrogation of German Cryptographers of Pers Z S Department of the Auswaertiges Amt’

I uploaded TICOM report I-22 back in 2012, however my copy from the British national archives had several paragraphs deleted in pages 16-18.

I don’t like loose ends, so i was able to copy the same pages from NARA and they don’t have any deletions:









I’ve re-uploaded TICOM I-22 with the new pages in my Google drive and Scribd accounts.

Victory!

I recently presented new information on the use of the M-138-A strip cipher by the State Department in the period 1940-44.  

However there was a small problem! The entries for the second half of 1944 were not in the microfilm that contains the material for 1940-44.

This meant that I had to find the microfilm with the relevant entries and this was not an easy task. After examining the finding aid for the Department of State Decimal File it was clear that the 119.25/Strip cipher entries would be in film 611.

Thankfully this turned out to be the case and I finally have all the 1944 entries. It will take me a few days to read them and then I’ll add the information in New developments in the strip cipher case.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

22 June 1941 - Operation Barbarossa

On June 22 1941 the forces of Nazi Germany attacked the Soviet Union. This was the largest land campaign in history and casualties on both sides number in the tens of millions.

Some interesting aspects of the German invasion:

1). Was Stalin a fool who refused to believe that Hitler would attack him or was the situation more complex?


2). Were Soviet codes impregnable?


3). Were the German shocked by the performance of the new Soviet tanks like the T-34?


4). Some statistics on German and Soviet losses: